Dr Alex George became a national treasure in 22 days. Following five minutes of footage, however, his name has been married with terms such as needy, nasty and insecure. Are we officially over Dr Alex?

The past few weeks must have felt like emotional torture for Alex George.

Wallowing in Majorca sunshine and dossing about with zero responsibility sounds like the perfect summer holiday. Call it Love Island, and what you’ve got is a mentally taxing rollercoaster. Just ask Niall Aslam.

Alex has consistently failed to find love and has often been left clinging to the side of social situations. He’s that awkward single friend who immediately realises that tagging along to the cinema was a bad idea.

Yet, Alex has no choice but to do the same thing the very next day. And the next. And the next.

In a villa of fresh lovers, where each night ends with the sound of thick smooching, gigglish nuzzling and sexually-driven spooning, who wouldn’t completely lose their sh*t?

Alex has finally cracked.

Dr Alex took Ellie Brown to the side and released his pent-up anger as his grapes turned sour and sullen for the first time in series four.

The doctor remained calm and collected yet stabbed into Ellie with calculated and lucid accusations. Why? Because he didn’t want to feel as if he was to blame for the downfall of another relationship.

Alex, no-one is to blame, because it’s just chemistry.

Despite this, the argument with Ellie was billed on Twitter as a “nasty” and “vile” attack; with the British media gunning for the head of a fallen knight in shining armour.

Alex has not transformed from a placid, adorable and well-mannered A&E doctor to a malicious and insecure pig overnight. He is no Two-Face, and the whole dilemma is much more transparent than an anti-hero who has deceived us with false victim trickery.

No, Alex has simply had enough of heartache.

He no longer wants to be seen as the fall guy.

He doesn’t want to carry the heavy shadow of pity.

The mollycoddling of the entire villa and the entire U.K population has clouded Alex’s true personality like a sad, dampening smog.

We often forget that Alex is a 27-year-old medical professional. He’s one of the most mature and respected men in the villa, yet, for the past few weeks he has been swathed in bubble wrap; guided like a toddler and offered a sympathetic hand to hold.

Alex is not desperate for dating advice just because he doesn’t work on his abs seven days per-week, enjoys taking romance slowly and feels more comfortable referring to sex positions with terms like ‘“Doggy Fashion”.

He doesn’t need the smarmy input of people like Adam Collard or even pathetic confidence boosts from people like Jack Fincham.

We are not over Alex George, but we are over him being treated like a baby.

Let Alex be Alex and the public will quickly adore him again. We would rather see a pure Dr Alex cast out of the villa altogether, having our faith in love abolished, than to watch the doctor change his personality in order to please others.

That’s not the meaning of love.